Data

I’ve uploaded .csv files for all of my studies on the Open Science Framework. Links are below. Please email me (gordon.pennycook@yale.edu) if there are any issues downloading a file or if you need held deciphering my variable names (etc.).

Pennycook, G., Ross, R., Koehler, D.J., & Fugelsang, J.A. (2016). Atheists and agnostics are more reflective than religious believers: Four empirical studies and a meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 11, e0153039. Studies 1-4

Pennycook, G. & Ross, R.M. (2016). Commentary on: Cognitive reflection vs. calculation in decision making.Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 9. Study 1

Barr*, N., Pennycook*, G., Stolz, J.A., & Fugelsang, J.A. (2015). The brain in your pocket: Evidence that Smartphones are used to supplant thinking. Computers in Human Behavior, 48, 473-480. Study 1 / Study 2 / Study 3

Medimorec*, S. & Pennycook*, G. (2015). The language of denial: Text analysis reveals differences in language use between climate change proponents and skeptics. Climatic Change, 1-9. IPCC (LIWC) / IPCC (CM) / NIPCC (LIWC) / NIPCC (CM) / NIPCC (LIWC Concordances)

Pennycook, G., Fugelsang, J.A., & Koehler, D.J. (2015). What makes us think? A three-stage dual-process model of analytic engagement. Cognitive Psychology, 80, 34-72. Experiment 1 / Experiment 2 / Experiment 3 / Experiment 4

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2015). Is the cognitive reflection test a measure of both reflection and intuition? Behavior Research Methods, 1-8. Study 1

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Barr, N., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2015) On the reception and detection of pseudo-profound bullshit. Judgment and Decision Making, 10, 549-563data is available on the JDM website: http://journal.sjdm.org/vol10.6.html

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Barr, N., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2014). The role of analytic thinking in moral judgments and values. Thinking & Reasoning, 20, 188-214. Study 1

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Barr, N., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2014). Cognitive style and religiosity: The role of conflict detection. Memory & Cognition, 42, 1-10. Experiment 1 / Experiment 2 / Experiment 3

Pennycook*, G., Trippas*, D., Handley, S. J., & Thompson, V.A. (2014). Base-rates: Both neglected and intuitive.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, 40, 544-554. Experiment 1 / Experiment 2 / Experiment 3

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2013). Belief bias during reasoning among religious believers and skeptics. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 20, 806-811. Study 1

Pennycook, G., Cheyne, J.A., Seli, P., Koehler, D.J. & Fugelsang, J.A. (2012). Analytic cognitive style predicts religious and paranormal belief. Cognition, 213, 335-346. Study 1 / Study 2

Pennycook, G., Fugelsang, J.A. & Koehler, D.J. (2012). Are we good at detecting conflict during reasoning? Cognition, 124, 101-106. Experiment 1 / Experiment 2 / Experiment 3 / Experiment 4 / Experiment 5

 Pennycook, G. & Thompson, V.A. (2012). Reasoning with base-rates is routine, relatively effortless and context-dependent. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 528-534. Experiment 1